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Jump-Start Your Day

Friday, February 2nd, '18

All rights reserved © message by Kris Jackson

 

CUTTING A FEW Z's

"Yet a little sleep, a little slumber, a little folding of the hands to sleep..." (Proverbs 24:33)

 

There are three different inclinations in that text. Everyone has to sleep. It is as vital a function as eating or breathing, just remember, people die in their sleep. When we snooze we lose. When we rest we rust, slack we lack. "So shall your poverty come as one that travels" (vs 34), which pictures a wandering hobo. First he begs "a little sleep". Sleep implies sawing logs, cutting Z's, completely out of it, off in alpha zone. Well, if I can't sleep then may I at least have "a little slumber"? Slumber and lumber have the same root. It implies, laid out long and flat, not sound asleep, but stretched out to rest. Okay then, if I can't slumber may I at least have "a little folding of the hands" to relax? All the writer wants at that point is to cup his hands behind his head and lay the recliner back for a five-minute break. Is that all that bad?

 

Solomon is the one with the pen in hand. He did not scale Israel's throne by taking lunch breaks. He had a solid work ethic. His dad, David, had commissioned him, "Arise therefore, and be doing..." (1 Chronicles 22:16) Solomon was a doer. He built the Temple. He "spake three thousand proverbs: and his songs were a thousand and five" (1 Kings 4:32). That took some mental engagement. He "was building his own house thirteen years, and he finished all his house" (1 Kings 7:1). He was a finisher, not just a starter. "All these were of costly stones...hewed stones, sawed with saws, within and without..." (7:9) Aching muscles begged the Ben Gay tube, still he pushed his body. He believed in accomplishment, being able to measure progress at the end of the day. If anyone needed to fold his hands for a few Z's it would have been King Solomon. He was tired, yet tireless, if that makes any sense. He believed a man ought to work half a day six days a week and it didn't matter which half he worked, the first twelve hours or the second.

 

The flesh would rather punch the snooze button another time. It all goes back to the old adage, you can pay now and play later or you can play now and have to pay later. Of course it is possible to overdo. Solomon, the old man, wrote, "I made me great works; I built houses...vineyards...gardens...pools of water", etc. then looked at all the work of his hands and said, "...all was vanity and vexation of spirit" (Ecclesiastes 2:11). The key is not to work hard but to work smart, but work we must. It is easier to sleep than reap. He "that sleeps in harvest is a son that causes shame" (Proverbs 10:5). Dorothy, Toto and Company fell asleep in the poppy field when Oz was in sight. The temptation is to throw in the towel as to far off dreams and take the less expensive course, "a little folding of the hands to sleep", but reaching destiny requires desire, duty, discipline and above all constant diligence and doing. Solomon never retired. He stepped from this world into that world with a trowel still in his hand. That is the way every man should meet his Master - "Blessed is that servant, whom his lord when he comes shall find so doing" (Luke 12:43). We will get to rest later but there are still daylight hours available wherein we can fulfill His will. The go home bell will ring soon enough, until then, "Occupy till I come" (Luke 19:13).


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