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Wednesday, October 10th, '18

All rights reserved © message by Kris Jackson

 

REARING KINGS

"The words of king Lemuel, the prophecy that his mother taught him" (Proverbs 31:1)

 

We're assuming Bathsheba is the mother spoken of in this text. She had a pet name for her son, Solomon, that being, Lemuel. The name means "for God". As Hannah had lent her son to the Lord so Bathsheba infers the same by calling her and David's only son Lemuel, or "for God". Note first that Bathsheba, considered the "model" mother in this chapter, was by no means model. I don't have to mention the details. You know about her and David and the plot. The good news is that flawed parents can have exceptional kids.

 

Notice it was a "prophecy" that Lemuel's mother "taught" him. Had it come from Dad, he would have "told him". Instead, mother "taught him". The difference between told and taught is like the difference between a college professor lecturing from a podium and a caring coach getting down in the grass acting out plays with the team. The proverb says, "Train up a child in the way he should go..." Training goes beyond mere teaching. She taught a "prophecy", that is, she had a concept in mind, a hope for destiny, position and power.

 

"It is not for kings, O Lemuel...to drink wine..." (vs 4) She laid down standards but only because of the potential she saw in her son. She was grooming her boy for royalty when common sense suggested that Absalom or perhaps Adonijah would be next in line and better suited for the job. A mother's faith doesn't consider those odds or factors. She prophesies greatness over the next generation expecting God to intervene and make a way.

 

If you thought your Mom was too strict it was because she believed in you. All moms harp on the same basic subjects, loose ladies, "Give not thy strength unto women", fast cars, "nor thy way to that which destroys kings", and wild parties, "It is not for kings to drink wine". It's the mother hen syndrome. She doesn't want you to forfeit your future. And there is a reason for all this; she has a personal stake in your success. It sounds like she is hard of hearing. Three times in verse two she asks, "What?" When Mom says "what" she is not seeking information, she's trying to jog her son's senses. Notice her connection to her son's destiny. "What, my son?" That is a physical tie. "And what, the son of my womb?" That is an emotional tie. For nine months he formed beneath her naval and twenty, thirty, fifty years later, she feels him still connected in the level of "womb". "And what, the son of my vows?" That is a spiritual tie. She had prayed over this boy, made vows regarding his future. The cost is far greater than just a baby delivery, nursing and eighteen years of laundry. Solomon was Bathsheba's connection with legacy, a reason for being. All mothers know what I'm talking about even though, as a man, I may not understand it myself. Some kings are born into royalty; others are nurtured into it, taught, trained and loved onto the throne. Don't give up moms. Your son is going to grow up to be a leader someday. Don't forget those early vows.


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