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Jump-Start Your Day

Friday, April 26th, '19

All rights reserved © message by Kris Jackson

 

LIVE TOMORROW TODAY

"Take therefore no thought for tomorrow, for tomorrow shall take thought for the things of itself..." (Matthew 6:34)

 

By that statement I don't mean to live like there is no tomorrow, but we should live tomorrow today, that is, don't put off doing what we always wished we could do just because the timing isn't right or we don't have resources to pull it off. My friend Mike Hardin preached three good points on "forgetting those things which are behind" at last week's camp meeting. He said we tend to "over-exaggerate the past and over-anticipate the future but we underestimate the present". That is so true. We make the good ole days out to be "gooder" than they actually were. The past needs passed. When someone wants to rehearse war stories about their gall stone surgery or pull out their shirttail to show you their appendectomy scar, politely say, "I'll pass". Dead things rest best when left alone.

 

We over-exaggerate the past. Second, we over-anticipate the future. Living in expectancy is a key factor in faith and we certainly need to anticipate big things in God. But it becomes a scratched record when someone is always talking of what someday they are going to do. Intention is not the mother of invention. There are career students. There are career daydreamers. One father was asked what his career student son was going to be when he finally finished college, to which the dad answered, "A very old man". So often we hold out when we ought to sell out. Another wit said that "when you get light on it you need to get right on it!" Every morning when the sun rises this elusive thing called tomorrow is moved back another twenty-four hours. Tomorrow never comes so we need to live tomorrow today.

 

Paul warned that today is the day of salvation. Tomorrow is a date on a fool's calendar. We can plan for it, we can anxiously aim toward it, but the secondhand of our "today" keeps ticking despite all our planning. There is a reaction to our inaction; do you know what it is? Nothing. Nothing happens when nothing happens. Profound, huh?

 

Third, we underestimate today. I guess the reason is because today seems so ordinary. We are always looking for that big break, waiting for someone to discover us. Hey, if you don't discover yourself no one else is going to discover you. We look for saviors, knights in shining armor, that one make-or-break phone call, the sweepstakes check to come in, the lotto numbers to match, all the while forgetting that all the miracles Jesus performed came on ordinary days. Life is monochromatic only if you choose for it to be. Every color on a Monet palette is present in the city park down the street but few people take time to behold it. Don't underestimate today. What seems mundane, typical, monotonous, and so "everyday" in the everyday, bears the seeds of greatness. Jesus came to His own and His own did not recognize Him. They looked for an imperial warrior, not a Nazarene carpenter. It will blow you away when you start asking ordinary guys their personal stories. Sam Walton drove around Rogers and Bentonville, AR in his old pickup truck. A stranger would mistake him for one of the local retirees. They certainly wouldn't peg him as the richest man in America. You've probably brushed shoulders with such a person today and didn't even know it. That is because we tend to judge books by their covers...and therefore days by big events rather than simplicity.


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